Nightwish & Olzen through…

 From Nightwish official website http://nightwish.com/en/

Press statement

Another chapter of the Nightwish story has ended today. Nightwish and Anette Olzon have decided to part company, in mutual understanding, for the good of all parties involved.

In recent times it has become increasingly obvious that the direction and the needs of the band were in conflict, and this has led to a division from which we cannot recover.

Nightwish has no intention of cancelling any upcoming shows, and as a result we have decided to bring in a substitute vocalist starting in Seattle 1.10.2012. Her name is Floor Jansen from The Netherlands (ex-After Forever, ReVamp), and she has graciously stepped in to help us complete the Imaginaerum world tour.We are all strongly committed to this journey, this vehicle of spirit, and we are sure that this will lead to a brighter future for everyone.

We forever remain excited about the adventures to come, and we are extremely proud of the two beautiful albums and the wonderful shows we shared together.

– NIGHTWISH & Anette Olzon

Indica – A Way Away

     Granted, Indica could never be mistaken for PowerMetal. More to the point, they only slightly border within the Metal realm. They are very Symphonic and much more so on this; their first all english language release.
     Yes, that Toumas Holopainen of Nightwish produced this album and invited his friend Pip Williams to do the score changed the dynamics of the songs (all but one previously released on earlier albums sung in Soumi). Still, they remain the same.

     What interested me in Indica was that vocalist, Jonsu, had recorded with Nightwish during the Dark Passion Play sessions. She sang the song titled Last Of The Wilds, an instrumental track on Dark Passion PlayErämaan Viimeinen (The Last One In The Wilderness) was released on the Platinum edition of Dark Passion Play

     The thing is, while not being Metal, the heavier songs are chunky sounding and the lyrics are poignant, as are those on the slower, more mellow songs, but the heavy music is laden with a sharp sarcasm that Jonsu expresses as well as Dave Mustaine of Megadeth does.
     To say that this is a PopMetal laden album would not be doing it any justice since those songs that are not faster have a melancholy mood to them, yet, I would be hard-pressed to call it Gothic.
     
“Little sister, playing hide and seek
Even though mama told you I’m really gone
If you miss me, sneak a peek at my diary
Or read the peek-a-boo sky that lights the night…”
     (
from In Passing)

     A bit melancholy, but not Gothic dark in any way. Even if the music is not to your musical palette, the lyrics and the way they are offered to you shows a mature band with strong writing and storytelling skills.

Indica is:
                    Jonsu – Vocals & Violin
                    Heini – Bass
                    Jenny – Guitars
                    Laura – Drums
                    Sirkku – Keyboards & Grand Piano

Track listing for A Way Away:
01: Islands Of Light
02: Precious Dark
03: Children Of Frost
04: Lilja’s Lament
05: In Passing
06: Scissors Paper Rock
07: A Way Away
08: As If
09: Straight And Arrow
10: Eerie Eden
11: Outside In*

     Metal? Not so much. Good? Definately.
     Those that I have played the album for tend to like it despite what their musical taste is. Also, when people are over, it is one album they most want to hear again.
     Hailing from Finland, unknown in the United States but for those that seek out new music; give these ladies their due and give this album a few listens – it will grow on you.

* – Bonus track.

Avantasia – The Scarecrow

     For a 50th post, I wondered what band, what album, I should write about. I was surprised when I realized I had not reviewed Kamelot‘s dark masterpiece, The Black Halo, and planned on choosing that record.
     Enter Miss Tiff (mischief), LadyLoveExtraodinaire to yours truly, and a complete Kamelot fanatic, who said, “Do Avantasia, The Scarecrow. You’re always listening to it.”
     Indeed I do listen to The Scarecrow, quite a lot, really. I love the album and how well rounded the listening experience is. Mr. Sammat wrote, what I think, is the best mix of music and songs within his entire musical career.

     For fans of Avantasia‘s first two releases; The Metal Opera Part 1 and The Metal Opera Part 2, The Scarecrow, upon first listen, could be a shock. While some songs retained PowerMetal elements, most did not. In fact, I think the album has more of an American Metal vibe to it without being downright pretentious and patsying for an American audience.
     That Tobias was prompted to make another Avantasia album by friend and drummer for KISS, Eric Singer, who plays throughout the entire album, may be the reason for the style change, but don’t take me wrong, Singer can deliver PowerMetal double bass drum kicks as fast as anyone, it is just that he chooses not to do it all the time. Sometimes it really is only Rock”N’Roll.
    
Maybe Producer and Guitarist Sascha Paeth twisted the knobs and raised the levels while lowering others and tweeked the sound in final mixing to achieve a less polished, more chunky and gritty sound.
     Whatever the reason for the style change, by the end of first listen, you will know that it works and the music fits well with Tobias‘s retelling of Goethe‘s Faust.

     As with prior releases, Avantasia has a core band; this time made up of Eric Singer (drums) of KISS, Sascha Paeth (Guitar) of Heaven’s Gate, and Tobias Sammat (Vocals & Bass) of Edguy. Not as many as before but there are more guest musicians stepping in to play lead guitar than before.
Kai Hansen (Helloween, Gamma Ray, Unisonic) plays additional guitar.
Henjo Richter (Gamma Ray, Rampage) plays additional guitars
Rudolph Schenker (Scorpions) palys additional guitars
Michael “Miro” Rodenberg (producer and guest musician of many PowerMetal bands) Keyboard & Orchestration.
     While there is less guest vocalists than before.
Bob Catley (Magnum)
Alice Cooper
Oliver Hartmann
(At Vance)
Roy Khan (Kamelot)
Michael Kiske (Helloween, Supa Red, Plave Vendome, Revolution Renaissance, Kiske / Somerville, Unisonic)
Jørn  Lande (Vagabond, Ark, Beyond Twilight, Masterplan, Allen / Lande)
Amanda Somerville (Kiske / Somerville, Trillium, and many guest vocal spots on many PowerMetal releases)

     Although the story of The Scarecrow is nowhere near as epic in material as The Metal Opera releases, it still holds on to the same majesty as its predecessors and much of that has to do with the phenominal prowess of the vocalists and Tobias himself knowing where to place a more PowerMetal sound to the music.

Track Listing for The Scarecrow:
01: Twisted Mind
02: The Scarecrow
03: Shelter From The Rain
04: Carry Me Over
05: What Kind Of Love
06: Another Angel Down
07: The Toy Master
08: Devil In The Belfry
09: Cry Just A Little
10: I Don’t Believe In Your Love
11: Lost In Space

     The Scarecrow is the first of three release that make up The Wicked Trilogy. The other two: Angel Of Babylon and The Wicked Symphony are equally as good as The Scarecrow.
     There were many critiques about this release. Yes, there were some pop elements thrown in; they were not overdone and lent texture to the song and did not become the song.
     Whatever the sound of an Avantasia release is, that it is so completely different than the last story is refreshing and usually occurs in revolving door bands.

Gnosis and life
AVANTASIA!

Nightwish – Imaginaerum

 Four years is a long time between albums unless your name is Def Leppard and you have a drummer that was in a bad car wreck costing him an arm so that he had to relearn how to play his drums with only one hand. Now there is Nightwish to add to the list.
     Don’t get me wrong, Imagenaerum is a fantastic release that shows the versatility of Toumas Holopainen‘s songwriting abilities and he wears his influences on his sleeve rather than underlying within the music’s background.
     Like many Nightwish fans, I too pine for the days of Oceanborn, inasmuch that I wish there was just more metal to the album in the form of guitar leads, runs, and fills… But damnit, that the songs on Imaginaerum are very good and guitarist Emppu Vuorinen admits that after the extended touring that came with the release of Dark Passion Play he was so burnt-out with playing his instrument that he did not touch it for any reason for months, hence, there is good reason that lead guitar work is minimal in the extreme on Imaginaerum.

     The video for Storytime introduced what the album would sound like and yes, it is evolved from Dark Passion Play. There is a darkness to the songs but because of how the album reads it is more in the vein of Tim Burton’s Nightmare Before Christmas / Corpse Bride than the standard Gothic melancholy. There is a reason for the darkness and it can be playful itself. That it comes off like a children’s movie should not surprise any fans of the band.

     So what is painstakingly different about Imaginaerum from Dark Passion Play? What makes the album shine and stand out? Tarja fans close your eyes. Anette Olzon makes this album work. If you don’t believe me give it a few spins.
     Anette‘s voice and how she uses it per song, sometimes squealing like, sometimes normal (or abnormal), sometimes with mock accent, Anette is the stand out performer.
     I don’t know that the songs were written more geared toward Anette’s voice but her voice fits comfortably to the songs. There is a song where, at first listen, it sounds like Marco Hietala singing but it turns out to be Anette. Huh? Who knew? Maybe that the turmoil of the early days of Nightwish is finished and that Anette‘s trial by fire (so to speak) is also over with, she has found her niche in the band and for those that still don’t believe, again, give this album a few listens and you too will decide that she has a very versatile, bluesy, soulful vocal range that goes well with Nightwish‘s music. 
 A kind of concept album much like Iron Maiden‘s Somewhere In Time was, every song dealt with the same subject: Time. Imagenaerum’s concept is loose and not storylike either yet you can tell that the songs tie together to form an entire. That the songs also stand well on their own (you don’t have to listen to the album from start to finish to get the meaning) is different than say Avantasia‘s Metal Opera‘s where coming into the album in the very middle can leave you wondering what the hell it means.

Track listing for Imaginaerum:
01: Taikatalvi
02: Storytime
03: Ghost River
04: Slow, Love, Slow
05: I Want My Tears Back
06: Scaretale
07: Arabesque
08: Turn Loose The Meramaids
09: Rest Calm
10: The Crow, The Owl, And The Dove
11: Last Ride Of The Day
12: Song Of Myself
13: Imagenaerum

     Pine for the days of Oceanborn, yes, yes, yes, we all do. The blog for the Oceanborn album has always been the most popular article on my site here and I do wish for a complete PowerMetal release from Nightwish again but this album is just so cool and there will be a movie that ties into it too, double down on the cool factor, aye?
     Like Within Temptation‘s Black Symphony, where does Nightwish go after this? WT went to a more hard rock sounding album, but c’mon, how could they top the performance of Black Symphony but by not trying to. As well, Imaginaerum is a pinnacle that could be easily repeated because it is so infectious. And just how much more symphony does ToumasMetal have within it? He is definitely a Maestro in this modern world of ours that leads us all back to childhood remembrances and makes us lonely for the days of childish innocence where everything was a wonder and nothing was short of amazing.
     As with every Nightwish release, I simply enjoy it and the pathways it takes me down. Imaginaerum put a smile on my face and this band, sans certain orginal members, still makes magic.

HammerFall – No Sacrifice, No Victory

  

      HammerFall is like ManOwaR, they kinda do their own thing. Their music can border the PowerMetal genre without ever completely staying within the vein. They are a Metal band.

     No Sacrifice, No Victory is a strong album with tried and true driving rhythm and loads of harmony and melody. Why I compare them to ManOwaR is that their music is overtly majestic in the same way that ManOwaR songs such as: Heart Of Steel, Kingdom Come, or Carry On are.
     What is great about this band, besides they are seasoned musicians, is their music has massive amounts of groove and can be deemed as, well, fun to listen to.
     An onslaught of anthem after Metal anthem for sure, but, unlike ManOwaR, HammerFall‘s cheesy does not reach the same heights, rather, they avoid it by not making every song strictly about themselves. They definately do not put supposed likenesses of themselves on their album covers. Granted, they do have some insanely funny, albeit cheesy, song intro’s (intro for Legion) and, like Iron Maiden, they have their own album cover artwork mascot: Hector, who has graced every release barring their latest, 2011’s Infected.

     I keep mentioning other bands in this. Being honest I will say this, HammerFall has found its own niche while remaining true to the style of music that made them want to play in the first place. Hence, when they sound like their influences, they really sound like their influnces. ManOwaR, Helloween, Dio, Accept, Iron Maiden… But they always sound like HammerFall.
     If you saw the movie Rock Star (debacle), HammerFall can be compared to fictitious band Steel Dragon, and why not? HammerFall vocalist Joacim Cans has trained vocally with Jeff Scott Soto (Talisman, Trans-Siberian Orchestra, Axel Rudi Pell, Yngwie Malmsteen, Journey, and a slew of guest appearances… vocal whore!) who, unlike the popular belief that Steelheart vocalist Miljenko Matijevic did, sang the Steel Dragon songs. Yes, Joacim can belt it out with the best of them and I relish anyone who sounds like a classic Metal voice. Ronnie Dio, Michael Kiske, Jeff Scott Soto, David DeFeis, Eric Adams, Rob Halford, Rob Rock, and Joacim Cans – all great metal vocalists.

     HammerFall is mostly considered PowerMetal by their fans. I would be hard pressed to add the Power before the Metal. Some songs, yes, but they play some damn good Metal music that is as based in technical theory as it is in Rock. It’s heavy, it grooves, it’s true HeadBangin’ music.

track listing for No Sacrifice, No Victory:
01: Any Means Necessary
02: Life Is Now
03: Punish And Enslave
04: Legion
05: Between Two Worlds
06: Hallowed Be My Name
07: Something For The Ages*
08: No Sacrifice, No Victory
09: Bring The Hammer Down
10: On Of A Kind
11: My Sharona**

* a f*ckin’ rockin’ instrumental
** Cover of The Knack‘s #1 song of 1979

     HammerFall – true Metal at its best. Yeah, you could party to this shit. Mm-Hmm.

 

Break Yer Neck
Headbang
Metal!!!

Have a sick new year!
\m/

Kamelot – Karma

      As The Fourth Legacy, Kamelot’s fifth studio release – Karma, continued the trek into a realm of music that sounded majestic; from the symphonic sounds and music, to the lyrics; Karma is loaded with positive energy even when trying hard to not be.

     The album leadoff, Regalis Apertura, written by co-producer, Miro, and played by him using the keyboard, sums the album up before even hearing the whole album. It begins like a Hollywood epic blockbuster before moving into a sound you could imagine hearing in a castle bazar while a juggler walks backwards in front of you trying their damnedest to entertain you out of a few coins. Towards the end the sound gets darker before trailing of into stark oblivion. Yes, the album is like this. What is amazing is Miro did all this in less than two minutes. 

     I don’t know whether to deem this release introspective or speculative because the lyrics can seem dark and moody with Kahn‘s voice, yet they can also seem uplifting as well. It is a very tempered album and one can hope that Sascha Paeth was trying for this and it is not just a brilliant mistake. If it is a sound stumbled upon, the band and producers kept it for the release after Karma, Epica.
     Musically, Karma is a Metal/PowerMetal release with odd, almost unnoticable changing guitar rhythm (just listen to the playing!) and double bass kicking drums that gallop. Yes, there is some Iron Maiden influence here, however, Thomas Youngblood is the type of guitarist who plays for the sake of his music and does not tend to over or underdo his leads and fills – they are a part of the song and not the only thing you have been waiting to hear.
     Speaking of odd rhythm, the song Karma sounds as if a less accomplished vocalist would have considered it a nightmare to figure out the best way to perform it.

     Kamelot, the band, sounds sterile in the studio. Live, the songs shine bright with slightly different interpretations than what is given from the studio. I don’t mean the studion cuts are less than those performed by the band on stage, I have wondered though, if the band works the songs even after recording them to get the exact sound they were truly striving for.
     Unknown as this album may be, one listen to Karma will tell you why the band still plays a few of the songs live to this day. Forever is crowd-pleaser that audiences love to sing to. Karma (the song) is favored by the band and the short, but sweet, jazz vocal style in the middle comes across well. Elizabeth (about Countess Bathory) played live shows just how well Roy Khan can sing in whatever genre you can think of.  

Track listing for Karma:
01: Regalis Apertura
02: Forever
03: Wings Of Despair
04: The Spell
05: Don’t You Cry
06: Karma
07: The Light I Shine On You
08: Temples Of Gold
09: Across The Highlands
10: Elizabeth I: Mirror, Mirror
11: Elizabeth II: Requiem For The Innocent
12: Elizabeth III: Fall From Grace
13: Ne Pleure Pas*
14: Once And Future King**

     You know, I can’t think of any one song on Karma that I like less than the other. There are two mellow songs and Kahn’s vocal delivery on both is exquisite. Yeah… Karma is a very great album indeed.

* Is the song Don’t You Cry sang in the French language. It is on the U.S. release of Karma.

** Japanese bonus track.

Most of Kamelots bonus tracks can be found on the compilation Myth’s And Legends Of Kamelot.

\m/

Trans-Siberian Orchestra – The Christmas Trilogy / The Ghosts Of Christmas Eve

     As mentioned in the last Post for Savatage – Dead Winter Dead, the band, under the guidance of producer Paul O’Neill morphed into Trans-Siberian Orchestra. I say morphed because they didn’t change their name, Savatage released other albums later on, and TSO was not only Savatage although they remain the entities key players:
     Paul O’Neill – Producer/Composer/Lyricist
     Jon Oliva – Composer/Vocals
     Al Pitrelli – Composer/Guitar/Musical Director
     Johnny Lee Middleton – Bassist
     Chris Caffery – Guitars
     Jeff Plate – Drums

     Trans-Siberian Orchestra took off before their was even a Trans-Siberian Orchestra. Maybe it was denial by the general public but they just did not want to accept that the cool heavy rock sounding Christmas song was played by a band named Savatage. Regardless of names, the public loved the song: Christmas Eve (Sarajevo 12/24) and mainstream radio added it into their holiday play lists.

 
     Christmas Eve & Other Stories is the debut release from TSO.
     The album was a bestseller soley based on the song Christmas Eve (Sarajevo 12/24) and it received very positive reviews for its innovation and approach to Christmas holiday music.
    Not only were TSO writing new Christmas songs, they were reimagining old ones for instrumental pieces.

     The album begins with a storyline that you have to read (you don’t need to if you don’t want to follow the story the songs are telling and just want to relax and enjoy the music). I don’t want to get into the back story as it is long but you can find all the stories from the Christmas trilogy and the bands other releases here: http://trans-siberian.com/.
     Of course Christmas Eve in the title refers to that song but what is important is “& Other Stories” as many of the songs from beginning bring the listener to the importance of the the last story (the story within the story).
     Lets start.
     An angel is told by God to go down to the Earth on Christmas Eve to find out what good people have done in the name of the day; Christmas.
     yes, the angel discovers alot of music and holiday cheer but he also finds sadness and despair but even within those emotions he feels the dreams and hopes of the human spirit.
     Along his travels, the angel feels a prayer from a father whose child (daughter) is not home this holiday season. The story never says why she is not home, why she is wandering the streets of New York City; only that the father does not know what has driven a divide between he and his daughter.
     Through celestial manipulation, the angel brings the only person nearby the girl to help her. He is also a workaholic who cares about nothing but his business and profits. The girl gets home to her father who rejoices that she is home.
     Realize that this is a condensed retelling of the story of The Pordigal Son without all the sinful details but it also speaks of the human condition and if it seems a bit far-fetched; it really isn’t. I know. 
     The stories end with the angel returning to Heaven and giving what he found to God. Within the last song, after the angel is back, Kyrie plays. A fitting end to an innovative album.

Tacklisting for Christmas Eve & Other Stories:
01: An Angel Came Down
02: O Come All Ye Faithful/O Holy Night (instrumental)
03: A Star To Follow
04: First Snow (instrumental)
05: The Silent Nutcracker (instrumental)
06: A Mad Russians Christmas (instrumental)
07: The Prince Of Peace
08: Christmas Eve (Sarajevo 12/24) (instrumental)
09: Good King Joy
10: Ornament
11: The First Noel (instrumental)
12: Old City Bar
13: Promises To Keep
14: This Christmas Day
15: An Angel Returned
       Post Script
16: O Holy Night
17: God Rest Ye Merry Gentleman
        On Special Releases
18: Whoville Medley (Perfect Christmas Night/Grinch)

      Trans-Siberian Orchestra‘s second release, The Christmas Attic, again tells the story of an angel sent to earth, but this time he is to leave one thing that will benefit mankind.

     It’s never that simple with TSO. They relish in stories within stories within…

     This one differs in that a young girl is on the brink of losing childhood innocence. Seems that other children at school have instilled doubt in her about whether Saint Nicholas (Santa Claus) is real or not.
     She cannot ask her parents as she has been told they are part of the entire Christmas conspiracy. So, like any child, she decides to wait up for Santa to make his appearance in the one room closest to the roof where he lands his sleigh – the attic.

     While in the attic, the angel gets her to notice an old storage chest and the magic is released.
     It doesn’t really hold magic but it does hold something just as powerful; mementos and memories that with the right amount of childhood innocence and imagination become magical.

     As with the first album, this release too has its sad moments. Although there is not as many instrumental pieces as the first release; it is the sadness in some of the stories that makes this album so poignant.

     Trans-Siberian Orchestra can be accused of Aesopian storytelling. Every album focuses on moralistic points (even their non-Christmas themed releases). Forgiveness, hope, that it is never too late, innocence over jaded viewpoints, and cherishing life no matter what kind of life you have. This release gives homage to the innocence of children. Not very Metal? They’re doing what they want and that is very Metal.

     The Christmas Attic garnered another huge hit for TSOChristmas Canon. It is Pachelbel‘s Canon in Dmajor redone with a children’s choir for vocals. It is also the third bestselling digital Christmas song. Another version done with guitars, sans children’s choir, appears on a late release. I know a lot of people who, having heard TSO‘s version on The Christmas Attic, have used for their wedding song.

     All being said, The Christmas Attic is, like its predecessor, Christmas Eve & Other Stories, a mostly light and airy release. It is a Christmas album.

track listing for The Christmas Attic:
01: The Ghosts Of Christmas Eve
02: Boughs Of Holly (instrumental)
03: The World That She Sees
04: The World That He Sees*
05: Midnight, Christmas Eve (instrumental)
06: The March Of The Kings/Hark, The Herald Angels Sing (instrumental)
07: The Three Kings And I (What Really Happened)
08: Christmas Canon
09: Joy/ Angel’s We Have Heard On High
10: Find Our Way Home
11: Appalachian Snowfall (instrumental)
12: The Music Box
13: The Snow Came Down
14: Christmas In The Air
15: Dream Child (A Christmas Dream)
16: An Angel’s Share
17: Music Box Blues

     I remember reading a review for The Christmas Attic in which the author wrote that there is nothing new on the release, nothing different from Christmas Eve & Other Stories. I wonder how much of the music the writer actually listened to? Yes, the music is along the lines of Christmas Eve & Other Stories, but songs like The Music Box, Dream Child, An Angel’s Share, Christmas Canon, Music Box Blues, The Three Kings And I… There was no songs like them on the first release.

* released only on later versions of the album.

     For all those who pined for a more serious release. A more symphonic release (as if the other two releases were not symphonic enough), this is it.
     I will note that it is, at times, melancholy, but very introspective.

     As the story continues…

     Again the angel is sent to Earth on a quest by God. This trip he has to bring him the name of the person that best continues the work of his son on Earth.
     Aside from the daunting task, the angel can only use his power of flight twice. Once to descend and again to return to Heaven.

     Okay, this album has its light and airy moments but for the most part it is dealing with heavy issues. Emotions permeate many of the songs, and many can be deemed on the Gothic side.
     First off, take the cover. See the guitar in the snow globe? Homage to Criss Oliva, original guitarist for Savatage, brother to Jon Oliva, whose life was ended by a drunk driver? Maybe. It is who I thought of upon first seeing the cover.
     And then there is the music.
     From the start there is a melancholic feel to it. Like the second album, The Christmas Attic, this release, too, deals with ghosts and spirits, though more depth is used, in turn making the songs longer, a bit more progressive, less Rock sounding and more Metal.
     Don’t let the mood stop you from listening to this release. Christmas, and holidays in general, are not only times of happiness. There are many people who suffer through them with memories of once good times but now, because life gives you what it gives you and rarely what you want and plan for, holidays mean remembering what is now lost or gone in their life, or their failures.
     But like TSO does, they take you to those memories and let you know that it is never too late in your life to turn things around.

     The instumentals on this album are ridiculously excellent. Unlike the first two releases, the instrumental faire here is based on classic music from the Classical and Baroque periods.
     The story inside the story is extremely sad and at times can make you angry at how selfish human beings can be. But again, it is a retelling of another story,  A Christmas Carol, a story of a stained and tarnished life and the redemption of the spirit. Does it happen? Can a selfish, egotistical, holier-than-thou- SOB change? I don’t know, but TSO makes you believe that with the right amount of magic and timing, because timing is everything, a person can change who and how they are in a night.

     This album clocks in at over 66 minutes of music. Some songs are short and can lead the listener to wonder why they even included them at all, but in the end they have their place. They are not intro’s. Nor are they interlude’s. Imagine what New York City may be like at Christmas and you can imagine hearing a brass band or bells chiming a tune in the distance. Ambience.

Track Listing for The Lost Christmas Eve:
01: Faith Noel (instrumental)
02: The Lost Christmas Eve
03: Christmas Dreams
04: Wizards In Winter (instrumental)
05: Remember
06: Anno Domine
07: Christams Concerto (instrumental)
08: Queen Of The Winter Night (instrumental)
09: Christmas Nights In Blue
10: Christmas Jazz (instrumental)
11: Christmas Jam
12: Siberian Sleigh Ride (instrumental)
13: What Is Christmas?
14: For The Sake Of Our Brother
15: The Wisdom Of Snow (instrumental)
16: Wish Liszt (Toy Shop Madness) (instrumental)
17: Back To Reason, Part 2
18: Christmas Bells, Carousels, & Time (instrumental)
19: What Child Is This?
20: O’ Come All Ye Faithful (instrumental)
21: Christmas Canon Rock
22: Different Wings
23: Midnight Clear

 
 

 
     This is not a live performance DVD. Neither does it tell the stories from either of the first two albums, Christmas Eve & Other Stories and The Christmas Attic. It is a stand alone story written especially for this DVD release that uses songs from both the first two CD releases.

     The story is about a young girl who runs away from home, to get out of the cold she breaks into an old theater. As is Trans-Siberian Orchestra’s way, the theater is filled with mementos and memories, ghosts and spirits who, with the help of an elderly caretaker, work to turn the girl’s life around.

     The DVD is short and may leave you wondering why they made it other than that they could, but it also shows the timelessness of the songs and that they can inspire in many different scenerios.
     Of note, the elderly caretaker is played by the late Ossie Davis, who, for some odd reason, you can imagine him hanging out in an old run down theater…Creepy.
     Jewel and Michael Crawford make guest appearances.

Track Listing For The Ghosts Of Christmas Eve:
01: O’ Come All Ye Faithful/O’ Holy Night
02: Good King Joy
03: Hark! The Herald Angels Sing
04: Christmas Eve (Sarajevo 12/24)
05: Christmas Canon
06: O’ Holy Night
07: Music Box Blues
08: Promises To Keep
09: This Christmas Day
10: First Snow

     I don’t believe that at the time of this release TSO had even toured yet. Yeah, I think they had only played one live show by this time.
     Having seen Trans-Siberian Orchestra perform live a few times, I can say that they put on one hell of a show. If you get the chance to see them, please remember this, it is a Christmas holiday event geared toward families. I went with my young son, Blade, and the guy sitting nearby us was inhebriated, stank like a brewery, kept spilling his alcohol, and cursed as if he was at a local dive-bar. What an ass!

     Well, that’s it.  

METAL!
\m/

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